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Literature Reviews

This guide provides detailed information about conducting a literature review.

Types of Literature Reviews

Different projects involve different kinds of literature reviews with different kinds and amounts of work. And, of course, the "end products" vary.

  • Honors paper
  • Capstone project
  • Research Study
  • Senior thesis
  • Masters thesis
  • Doctoral dissertation
  • Research article
  • Grant proposal
  • Evidence based practice

Credit: Marian Hampton, University of Pittsburgh Libraries, Literature Review, https://pitt.libguides.com/literaturereview

A Literature Review is NOT

Keep in mind that a literature review defines and sets the stage for your later research.  While you may take the same steps in researching your literature review, your literature review is not:

Not an annotated bibliography in which you summarize each article that you have reviewed.  A lit review goes beyond basic summarizing to focus on the critical analysis of the reviewed works and their relationship to your research question.

Not a research paper where you select resources to support one side of an issue versus another.  A lit review should explain and consider all sides of an argument in order to avoid bias, and areas of agreement and disagreement should be highlighted.

 

Credit: Marian Hampton, University of Pittsburgh Libraries, Literature Review, https://pitt.libguides.com/literaturereview

 

(Video) Overview of Literature Review

This video created by the North Carolina State University Libraries provides a detailed overview of literature reviews and the process of conducting a literature review. It includes examples of literature reviews as well.

Maps and Directions

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